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PmWiki • PmWikiPhilosophy

This page describes some of the ideas that guide the design and implementation of PmWiki. Patrick Michaud doesn't claim that anything listed below is an original idea; these are just what drive the development of PmWiki. You're welcome to express your disagreement with anything listed below. PmWiki.Audiences also describes much of the reasoning behind the ideas given below.

1. Favor writers over readers
At its heart, PmWiki is a collaborative authoring system for hyperlinked documents. It's hard enough to get people (including Pm) to contribute written material; making authors deal with HTML markup and linking issues places more obstacles to active contribution. So, PmWiki aims to make it easier to author documents, even if doing so limits the types of documents being authored.

2. Don't try to replace HTML
PmWiki doesn't make any attempt to do everything that can be done in HTML. There are good reasons that people don't use web browsers to edit HTML--it's just not very effective. If you need to be writing lots of funky HTML in a web page, then PmWiki is not what you should be using to create it. What PmWiki does try to do is make it easy to link PmWiki to other "non-wiki" web documents, to embed PmWiki pages inside of complex web pages, and to allow other web documents to easily link to PmWiki.

This principle also follows from the "favor writers over readers" principle above--every new feature added to PmWiki requires some sort of additional markup to support it. Pretty soon the source document looks pretty ugly and we'd all be better off just writing HTML.

Another reason for avoiding arbitrary HTML is that ill-formed HTML can cause pages to stop displaying completely, and arbitrary HTML can be a security risk--more so when pages can be created anonymously. See http://www.cert.org/advisories/CA-2000-02.html for more information.

3. Avoid gratuitous features (or "creeping featurism")
In general PmWiki features are implemented in response to specific needs, rather than because someone identifies something that "might be useful". In any sort of useful system, it's hard to change a poorly designed feature once people have built a lot of structure based on it. (Need an example? Look at MS-DOS or Windows.) One way to avoid poor design is to resist the temptation to implement something until you have a clearer idea of how it will be used.

4. Support collaborative maintenance of public web pages
Although this wasn't at all the original intent of PmWiki, it became quickly obvious that WikiWikiWeb principles could be used to make it easier for groups to collaboratively design and maintain a public web site presence. PmWiki allows individual pages to be password protected, and a couple of local customizations makes it easy to protect large sections of PmWiki pages. Furthermore, in many ways PmWiki provides "style sheets on steroids": you can quickly change the headers, footers, and other elements on a large group of pages without ever having to touch the individual page contents. Finally, it's relatively easy to add custom markup for specialized applications.

5. Be easy to install, configure, and maintain
With a compressed gzip file size of just around 200K, uploading PmWiki to your server is a speedy operation. Do a chmod or two, update a few settings in config.php and you should be up and running. PmWiki stores all data in flat files, so there is no need for MySQL or other utilities. Upgrading is usually a simple matter of copying the latest version's files over the files of your existing PmWiki installation.

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July 2014:
Yate 5.4 and YateBTS 4 launched. Added JSON and DNS support in Javascript, Handover support in YateBTS.

March 2014:
YateBTS 2.0 launched. Added authentication and WebGUI. Added USSD support in commercial version.

March 2014:
Yate 5.2 launched. Better JavaScript support and a fixed memory leak.

Jan 2014:
YateBTS 1.0 launched. The first GSM Basestation which works with an IMS/VoLTE core network.

Jan 2014:
Yate 5.1 launched. Better JavaScript support and added libygsm. Elisa chatbot added in RManager

Oct 2013:
OpenHSS is the Yate based HLR/HSS solution for MVNO and LTE carriers.

Oct 2013:
Yate 5 released. Added IPv6 support in SIP for LTE. Improved JavaScript support. Download NOW

Jan 2013:
Yate 4.3 released: Added XML support in Javascript. SCCP - GTT routing between different networks. Stability improvements.
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Aug 2012:
Yate 4.2 released: SIP flood protection. Better Jabber/Google Voice support. Usable Javascript. Fixed SIGTRAN links fluctuations.
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Apr 2012:
YateClient was accepted in the Mac Store.

Yate 4.1 released: better Gvoice support, iSAC codec, support for new Wanpipe drivers. Fixes T.38 and Mac client issues.

Mar 2012:
SS7Cloud is launched today, 1st March, 2012, by NullTeam, Yate creators. Having all you need to be a US CLEC, it brings SS7 services in a cloud.

Feb 2012:
Yate 4.0 released.
SCCP, TCAP, MAP and CAMEL, TCP and TLS in SIP, Javascript fast prototyping of telephony applications and brand new face for YateClient.

Nov 2011:
Here is a video that, quote "demonstrates the truly awesome power of the YATE engine, as it easily handles 3 simultaneous calls to an audio player application including dtmf (button press) handling "(from PaintedRockComm).

Nov 2011:
Yate will attend ORR - OPENRHEINRUHR (November 12 - 13).

04 May 2011:
sipgate chooses open source project Yate for core infrastructure.

12 Apr 2011:
Yate 3.3.2 released.
Fix for Jingle calls to Google Voice dropping after 5 minutes.
4 Apr 2011:
Yate 3.3 released.
Support for GMail chat conference, fixes for internal microphone in MacOS. Minor fixes in SS7 M2PA and ANSI. Fixes in H.323, SIP and RTP.

9 Mar 2011:
Yate 3.2 released.
Bug fixes in SIGTRAN/MGCP/SS7 and added support for CNAM/LNP lookup by SIP INVITE/3xx.

Feb 2011:
Yate will attend FOSDEM and XMPP summit.

31 Jan 2011:
Yate 3.1 released.
Yate client support for Google Voice. Support for any country tones in tonegen.

20 Dec 2010:
Yate 3.0 released.
SS7 ITU certified. SS7 STP added. Client supports Jabber IM (Google Talk + Facebook).

3 May 2010:
Yate 3.0.0 alpha 3 released. Featuring the new Jabber server and wideband audio.

8 March 2010:
Yate 2.2 released. Mostly bug fixes. Dahdi compatible. Latest 2 release before 3.0.

6-7 February 2010:
Yate booth at FOSDEM 2010. Free CD with Freesentral available.

2 Nov 2009:
Yate 2.1 launched. Can replace a Cisco PGW2200 to control a Cisco AS54xx.

6 Aug 2008:
Yate and OpenSIPS (former OpenSER) join to build IP based clusters.

4 Aug 2008:
Yate 2 launched.


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